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What programming language do use ?
#1
I am curious. What programming language RF users use ?
Please no PHP.

Currently learning Go.
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#2
I mean the only real language I know somewhat is Java, took a class in high school for it. Yet once I head on to college, I would love to learn more such as C++, C#, etc.
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#3
I know a bit of Java, C++, C, and am learning Python
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#4
LISP, Haskell, Python
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#5
(06-14-2017, 08:29 PM)Abaddon Wrote:  LISP, Haskell, Python

Haskell seems really good. It's on my learning list.
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#6
I am a complete noob but I use C++ to build console applications to do simple but repetitive tasks. I use the bloodshed c++ complier.
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#7
C++, C#, PHP, Python
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#8
For programming mostly C/C++. For scripting Python, BASH, Perl and PHP.
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#9
(06-14-2017, 05:27 PM)mrzogs Wrote:  I am curious. What programming language RF users use ?
Please no PHP.

Currently learning Go.

You don't "learn" Go, if you have to learn Golang then you are autistic, that's even easier than python. Concurrency might be a little more difficult to grasp properly due to it being a little abstract but it shouldn't take you long as it is a basic concept that is applicable and understandable to everyday situations, and plus you should already be reading up on theory instead of wasting your time learning syntax if you are serious about programming anyway.

Nonetheless Go is a fun language i guess to use, i've used it on a couple of servers a few times and its concurrency certainly beats any solution Node has come up with, on a sidenote what a god awful runtime Node is. Urgh.
Anyway the languages i use vary depending on what i'm doing, languages aren't hard to learn, once you have the concepts down the syntax becomes a mere blip and you should have enough of an idea after 3/4 days of reading the language spec of what is good practise and what works where. I like working with abstract languages in personal projects, as work related languages and release programs tend to constrict what languages you can use, not fully allowing you to explore different paradigms and areas of computer science. I kinda was forced to start learning intel x86 assembly when i got into disassembling a few months back, it's really not difficult, all that's hard is thinking about what is going on and visualising the transfer of data.

To the user who said he learned lisp, i first ask what variation, secondly, good on you, it's a really beautiful language no matter what flavor you use. Except Clojure, fuck clojure... i once made a library in clojure for handling and sending/receiving specialised HTTP requests, what a dirty clusterfuck of a language it turned out to be. Imma go throw up.
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#10
not sure why you say "language", singular, rather than "languages", plural. every programmer should use more than one lang

I haven't been doing much programming recently but python, c# and java are my main uses
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#11
It depends on what you are trying to do? If you want to develop web sites then node is probably the best to learn as you can learn to program both the front and back end at the same time. I enjoy writing python. It is much simpler to write powerful code quickly. Only difficulty is when you want to add concurrency as the main python process still locks and is not truely concurrent. Only a minor performance issue.
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#12
I am a complete noob but I use C++ to build console applications to do simple but repetitive tasks. I use the bloodshed c++ complier.
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