HowTo: Effective SQL injection
by 0-R3c0n - December 19, 2018 at 08:48 AM
#1
So most databases tend to be leaked primarily from SQL injection. Every so often a hacker manages to get control of the web server or whatever, but SQL injection is the easiest route. Since prepared statements are too janky to really be implemented effectively the only effective defense against SQL injection is a good REGEX string. Often enough web providers do enact these but it is also true that there are a number of instances where people have to enter in dangerous characters such as single quotes, double quotes, asterisks etcetera. This is often mitigated with recursive slash escaping. Effectively implementing all those steps however is almost never accomplished by web developers so they tend to fall back on a WAF. If you have access to the type of WAF they have you can play with it until you find malicious characters that bypass it and you're pretty much good from there. All in all though...that's a lot of work lol. How many of you guys have managed to have luck with SQL injection in the wild?
#2
(December 19, 2018 at 08:48 AM)SteveTheBeaver Wrote: So most databases tend to be leaked primarily from SQL injection. Every so often a hacker manages to get control of the web server or whatever, but SQL injection is the easiest route. Since prepared statements are too janky to really be implemented effectively the only effective defense against SQL injection is a good REGEX string. Often enough web providers do enact these but it is also true that there are a number of instances where people have to enter in dangerous characters such as single quotes, double quotes, asterisks etcetera. This is often mitigated with recursive slash escaping. Effectively implementing all those steps however is almost never accomplished by web developers so they tend to fall back on a WAF. If you have access to the type of WAF they have you can play with it until you find malicious characters that bypass it and you're pretty much good from there. All in all though...that's a lot of work lol. How many of you guys have managed to have luck with SQL injection in the wild?

Can you check security of website 103.221.224.248?Many thanks
#3
(December 19, 2018 at 09:23 AM)hhhh4hhhh Wrote:
(December 19, 2018 at 08:48 AM)SteveTheBeaver Wrote: So most databases tend to be leaked primarily from SQL injection. Every so often a hacker manages to get control of the web server or whatever, but SQL injection is the easiest route. Since prepared statements are too janky to really be implemented effectively the only effective defense against SQL injection is a good REGEX string. Often enough web providers do enact these but it is also true that there are a number of instances where people have to enter in dangerous characters such as single quotes, double quotes, asterisks etcetera. This is often mitigated with recursive slash escaping. Effectively implementing all those steps however is almost never accomplished by web developers so they tend to fall back on a WAF. If you have access to the type of WAF they have you can play with it until you find malicious characters that bypass it and you're pretty much good from there. All in all though...that's a lot of work lol. How many of you guys have managed to have luck with SQL injection in the wild?

Can you check security of website 103.221.224.248?Many thanks

If it's not mine and I don't have permission I don't touch it. That's my rule.

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